Software Licenses’ Legal Notices

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When releasing software it is always good to release under a suitable license. Licensing policies were created to protect you and your code, restricting what others can do using your code, and not what you can do with your own code. The copyright holder (the author, e.g. you) is able to change licensing policies anytime, but, depending on the license you choose, only as long as every author and every person who has ever contributed to your project also agree.

Wikipedia offers a list of popular licenses and a comparison of free software licenses you can use in your projects. But no matter which one you choose, a common practice is to include a license notice header in all your source files to enforce the restrictions you have chosen. Here is a list of common headers for the most common available software licenses. Comparison between its different implications is beyond the scope of this post, but more information is available on the Additional Information section below.


GPL – GNU Public License (details)

LGPL – Lesser GNU Public License (details)

MPL – Mozilla Public License (details)

BSD License (details)

MIT License (details)

Apache License (details)

CC – Creative Commons (details)

Creative Commons licenses are not intended to apply to, and should not be used for software. I’ve included it here just to remember you.

Public Domain (details)

This is only a suggestion as there is no common sense on how to dedicate your work for the public domain. This excerpt was borrowed from the SQLite site, a popular software that is itself dedicated to the public domain.

WARNING: Please pay attention that the Public Domain Dedication is not a license. By using it, you do not simply carve out exceptions to your copyright; you grant your entire copyright to the public without condition. This grant is permanent and irreversible. You’ve been warned.


Additional Information


For a nice comparison of different licenses, implications and more useful information, please check:

Comparison of Source Code Licenses

Also, before blindly adopting the GPLv3, please be sure you have completely and correctly understood everything it says. For more info about the GPL and the GPLv2 vs GPLv3 debate, see:

The GPL for Dummies
The GPLv2 vs. GPLv3 Debate
What the kernel guys are and aren’t (and really should be) saying about GPLv3
The Dangers and Problems with GPLv3
The GPLv2 vs. GPLv3 Chart

Personally, I would rather go with the GPL v2 instead.

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